Cross J Painted Gem, ASPC/AMHR mare

American Miniature Horses for sale in Germany

You want to buy an American Miniature Horse? We offer American Miniature Horses for sale in Germany.  Our horses are sold with full papers (AMHA/AMHR and/or ASPC registered) and equine passport. Their well-being and the best care possible is very important to us.  No guarantees unless otherwise stated.

There is a little explanation why our miniature horses are so expensive further down on this page. If you are interested in one of our American Miniature Horses or have questions about the breed and their keeping, please send an email to info@delsastre-minis.de.

Cross J Painted Gem

Gender: Mare
Papers: ASPC/ AMHR
Born: 03/13/2014
Color: Black Pinto
Sire: LMJ Painted Kansas (HOF)
Dam: Painted Red’s Gem H (HOF)
RESERVED

DelSastre Nate's Quicksilver

Gender: Mare
Papers: ASPC/ AMHR (sells with no height guarantee)
Born: 28/05/2022
Color: Black Pinto
Sire: Caldwells National Treasure (last photo)
Dam: Cross J Painted Gem
SOLD

DelSastre Extasy's Querida

Gender: Mare
Papers: AMHA/ AMHR
Born: 10/05/2022
Color: Buckskin Pinto
Sire: EBF John’s Extasy (last photo)
Dam: Modello STR Bailamos Firenze
SOLD

EBF DelSastre Country Queen

Gender: Mare
Papers: AMHA/ AMHR/ ASPC
Born: 16/03/2022
Color: Black/Grey
Sire: D&S TG Ima Country Boy (last photo)
Dam: Modello ANA Bailamos Cosi Fan Tutte
SOLD

Co-owned with Cédric Dubroecq, Elevage de la Buise, France.

Why our American Miniature Horses are so expensive

Only rarely does it happen that a prospective buyer does not ask about the price. Statements like “Oh, I didn’t expect them to be so expensive?!?!?” are much more common. Or “Well, we don’t want to spend more than 500 euros! We don’t want to go to shows.” Or “But in Holland the minis cost a lot less… there you can buy some for only XYZ euros”. Or “But I saw some on the internet for a lot less money!”. The list can be continued quite a bit. So why pay more when you can get it cheap?

I would like to explain to all these people and those who might recognize themselves a bit here how the prices come about. Everyone is familiar with sayings such as “If you buy cheap, you buy twice.” And also “What costs nothing is worth nothing.”. These statements also fully apply to horses.

Of course you can get lucky and find a bargain. There are situations when someone may have to find a new home for their mini at short notice due to an emergency. In such cases, the price often does not matter and the seller wants to get rid of the horse asap. Breeders often give a discount if the horse goes to a show home. This can be a win-win situation for both sides and good advertising for the breeder. But in general, the costs of breeding, raising and keeping a miniature horse are not considerably lower than for other breeds.

Vaccinations, regular hoof care, deworming and good quality feed add up quickly. The stud fees for American Miniature Horses start at around 500/600 €. Top producing stallions that are in high demand often have a stud fee of 2,000 euros or even more. In addition, there are the registration fees, DNA test, equine passport, not to mention any costs for training, showing, driving or therapy training. This quickly adds up to an amount way beyond the “mini price for a mini horse” imagined by many first time buyers.

If you don’t want to or can’t invest more than a few hundred euros in your four-legged friend, you should still ask yourself as a prospective buyer how the supposed bargain price came about. At some point (or several) the breeder or seller saves money by cutting corners.

In the worst case you are going to pay twice as much of what you thought you were saving in the first place. Be it in the form of vet fees, special feed to compensate for nutritional deficiencies, special treatment from the blacksmith to correct serious flaws in conformation and the like. Getting valid papers can be just as difficult. Many a mini horse has been sold as an alleged American Miniature Horse, but then turned out to be “only” a Dutch Mini with NMPRS papers or a Partbred Shetland Pony.

Also, many buyers do not bother to register the transfer of ownership with the American associations or to apply for the permanent paper. So if you don’t know your way around paperwork, you may end up buying a Mini whose papers have long expired and are therefore worthless. If the horse is still registered in the breeder’s name but has already been passed through several hands, it can be difficult or impossible to obtain the signatures required for bringing the paperwork up to date.

In the end there is only one thing left to say: It is better to wait and save money, get in touch with a reputable breeder and wait for the right horse. Do your homework and try to not get tempted to buy the first cheap mini you come across just because it looks cute. This could turn out to be an expensive long-term project.

Modello STR Bailamos Firenze, American Miniature Horses